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Nice Girls Still Don't Get the Corner Office by Dr Lois Frankel
15 Apr

Nice Girls Still Don't Get the Corner Office by Dr Lois Frankel

 I was having one of my Sunday bookstore dates one beautiful, sunny Cape Town afternoon and like a bear with honey coated paws, I gravitated my sticky fingers towards the business and personal development sections of the store. At the time, I was with global intelligence and media company, Thomson Reuters, who put a great deal and emphasis on career and personal development, and I wanted so much to bulk study and learn. In its very bold pink letters, I saw a cover with the letters “Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office”, and my wallet and I fell for the bait.

Upon further reading and cooping myself up in Exclusive Books’, I realised that I was reading a revised and updated version of the book. “Nice Girls Still Don’t Get the Corner Office: Unconscious Mistakes Women Make that Sabotage their Careers” was the full name of the book, a mouthful, I know, but Dr Lois Frankel who authored the book does a great job in unceremoniously unpacking these mistakes.

Have you ever found yourself apologizing before you talk or ask a question? Immediately disqualifying your credentials for a job or board opportunity? Invalidate your article before it gets published, and thus never letting it see the light of day? How about always sitting at the back of meetings or using non-words, what Frankel describes as “credibility busters” to communicate? I’ll raise both my hands with you because I’ve been guilty of these behaviours, or what the author calls Nice Girl Behaviour, what she deems necessary but not sustainable for success.

In the book, Frankel confronts over 130 mistakes that women (and I’d like to add early entrants into the workplace and/or industry) make that set them up for corner office sabotage success; with the corner office a metaphor for transactional spaces (mental and physical) where we’ve placed boundaries that limit our potential to actualise our excellence and badassness. The book pairs coaching tips to action after every mistake as well as plentiful resources provided by Frankel and a few appearances from her industry peers. Delivered with the sharpness of freshly squeezed lemon juice, the author doesn’t shy away from recognising patriarchy’s psychological contribution and economic returns, as well as women’s conscious roles in sabotaging their own careers.

With that said, I strongly believe that some of Frankel’s strong biases would fall through the cracks in some chapters and mistakes ,and  in particular to the seventh chapter dealing with “How You Look”. As with any self-development resource, you have to take it with a pinch of articulation and understand that it’s as generic as the sand granules unless its tailored to a career development plan for you. There are definitely some coaching tips that I found incredibly helpful and have been using over the past few weeks, and others which the internal consultant in me honoured not for me.

Every few moments that I had to share snippets of the book on my social media platforms, the feedback would be from women who had already read it and provided great feedback and others who hadn’t, but wanted to ardently get their hands on it. I too, continue to greatly endorse this book from international best seller, Dr Lois Frankel, for all genders for self-development as well as conscious empowerment of women in the workplace and in industry.

 

 

Read 1961 times Last modified on Sunday, 31 May 2020 20:36